salt lamps

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Moaning Myrtle
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salt lamps

Post by Moaning Myrtle » Fri Sep 10, 2010 12:40 pm

So, i recently got a gift from a friend working in poland, this salt lamp.

http://thesaltlampstore.com/images/gift ... iftset.jpg

What im wondering is, are there any benefits of using this in a grow box? Ive read some random posts on the internet about salt drawing moisture, and surely this is good for the plant?

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Re: salt lamps

Post by andriaSRH » Fri Sep 10, 2010 3:16 pm

I thought the title of this thread was shit lamps for like a split second 0.o

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Weedguru Higher
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Re: salt lamps

Post by Weedguru Higher » Sat Sep 11, 2010 12:38 am

I can't recall ever heard of one of these used in a grow room in my many years of researching....But,

After doing a quick google search on the matter I came up with this...
A salt lamp is simply a chunk of mined salt that has been hollowed out to allow room for a lightbulb or tiny candle. The light glows through the medium of the salt crystal, which can range in color from a dark salmon pink to a pale orange. Salt crystals for salt lamps are mined in Russia and central Europe as well as in the Himalayas. Salt lamps make attractive accent lights. Their main attraction, however, is that the heating of the salt causes the crystal to release negative ions (often called simply 'ions').
The Science behind it - Crystal salt is one of the few minerals whose atomic structure is bound electrically, not molecularly. This characteristic of the mineral structure enables the crystal to change back and forth from crystalline to liquid state.
The gentle heat of the lamp in the salt crystal creates a higher surface temperature than the surrounding air. This attracts the water molecules in the cooler surrounding air. The natural humidity in the air condenses on the crystal's surface. This enables the electrically bound sodium chloride mineral to split into independent (positive) sodium and (negative) chloride ions.

This natural ionization creates an electric charge. After the water molecules evaporate again, the sodium and chloride ions turn back into their crystalline mineral form. When the sun heats up our largest natural salt solutions, the oceans, it generates the natural energy vibration of which our entire global environment consists. Salt crystal creates exactly the same natural energy field. Scientifically speaking, this natural ionization process takes place millions of times, invisible to the eye, and without any influence to the quality of the crystal. Similar to the concept whereby tree leaves absorb dangerous dioxides and transform them into essential oxygen, without damaging the plant.

The atomic structure of crystal salt contains more negative, chloride ions than positive, sodium ions which result in the emission of negative ions during the natural ionization process. Negative ions become dust collectors, attaching themselves to positively charged dust particles and cigarette smoke, purifying the circulating indoors air from dust, bacteria and pollutants.
Negative ions, are beneficial to a grow room and aid in odor control....
By Ed Rosenthal - Thursday, March 1 2001

How do negative ion generators affect plant growth?

Negative ions are oxygen molecules which have been loaded with an extra electron. They float in the air and when they encounter a positively charged molecule (which is missing an electron) the electron jumps, neutralizing both molecules. Positively charged particles include dust, bacteria, fungal spores and odor molecules. Eliminating these air-borne particles and causing them to precipitate is helpful to the growing environment. According to studies performed during the 1970s, both animals and plants performed better in a negative ion rich environment.

Negative ion generators use a miniscule amount of electricity to charge the air. They are harmless to use and eliminate odors which are not too intense. They should not be used in the grow room during the last two weeks because they will reduce the taste and fragrance of the buds. Instead, they should be placed outside the grow area so that any odor which escapes is eliminated.
And they do draw moisture (though you only would want to remove moisture in your grow room if you need to - that is if you have a high humidity issue)
Natural Salt lamps are for indoor use. Crystal Salt is hygroscopic; it draws moisture from the air. In case of increased humidity, the lamp should be turned on. The heated salt lamp will dry itself off.
So it looks to me like, yes they would be beneficial for growing, but more so directly outside of the growing room/ box rather than in it

Don't quote me on this though, cause I only briefly researched it...other than this I don't have any knowledge about it
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Moaning Myrtle
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Re: salt lamps

Post by Moaning Myrtle » Sat Sep 11, 2010 2:07 pm

thanks guys, ive started building a grow box, gonna post some pictures when its done, but was attacked by mosquitos yesterday so i ran inside

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Re: salt lamps

Post by Weedguru Higher » Sat Sep 11, 2010 10:05 pm

Alright! Hope to see a grow log from you soon!
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